Draft-Proof Your Windows for Winter

 Draft-Proof Your Windows for Winter

One drafty window is a little like pulling one brick away from your house. Imagine pulling out a brick for every leaky window, and suddenly, it’s like have a window (or several!) wide open in the middle of winter. That’s the example Donald McKenna, owner of McKenna Exteriors, offered when talking about the importance of sealing up drafty windows for winter.

He mentioned health concerns, too. Older aluminum windows, especially, are prone to sweating, which allows mold and mildew to grow around the window frames. Wooden windows shrink and swell with changes in the weather. They, too, can let in unwanted air and moisture that rot the wood or invite mold and mildew to take hold. Left unchecked, mold and mildew can make their way into the sheetrock of your home, which holds moisture and compounds the problems.

So what can you do about rattling, sweating, drafty windows? McKenna recommends these steps:

LATCH YOUR WINDOWS

It sounds obvious, but sometimes we don’t realize our windows are unlocked. When windows are unlatched, they have a tendency to inch up, inviting air and moisture into the house.

CLOSE DRAPES AND BLINDS

This is an all around good energy-saving move. Window treatments provide physical barriers to cold air and wind, blocking that icy air from entering your home. You can also find shrink-film insulation products at home improvement stores that stick onto your windows, sealing them from drafts.

REPLACE YOUR WEATHER STRIPPING

Each year, check the weather stripping on your windows and replace any that looks worse for wear. While you’re at it, check for rotting wood, mold or mildew, and other signs that your windows need some routine maintenance.

CLOSE STORM WINDOWS

Walk around outside to make sure your storm windows are all closed. Also do a check to see if they’re caulked all the way around.

REPLACE YOUR WINDOWS

If you’ve taken all these precautions but still have drafty windows, it may be time to install new windows. McKenna suggests talking with an expert to determine which product is best for your home. They’ll take into consideration issues like your budget, your home’s style, your neighborhood’s design requirements, and the problem you’re looking to solve. From there, they’ll help you select the best windows for your home.

 

WE HOPE THESE IDEAS AND TIPS ARE HELPFUL. PLEASE CALL ME WITH ANY OF YOUR HOME BUYING OR SELLING NEEDS AND QUESTIONS. (423-421-9192)

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